ntoma

Pollockism

One of my favourite artists is Jackson Pollock. He is famous for his style of drip painting and is one of the main figures in abstract painting. I love the way he uses colours to express energy and motions in a painting.

The outfit I wore today, reminded me of Pollock’s work. It reminded me of the time when I studied Art at A-level and I was working on a piece influenced by Pollock. I think the top looks like a pouring of colour thrown onto material. Can you see it?

Here are some pictures of my outfit of the day:

Pollickism 1

Pollickism 5

Pollickism 6

Pollickism 3

Pollickism 2

The front of top is a kriss kross arrangement of different Ntoma or Ankara (African fabric) fabrics. The back of the top is a navy sheer material.

Pollickism 4

Pollickism 7

Pollickism 8 Pollickism 9

What I wore:

Kriss Kross Ntoma/Ankara top- Made in Ghana

White Trousers- Vintage

Shoes- Marks & Spencer

Bracelet- Marks & Spencer (Limited Edition)

Bag- Zara

   Stay Blessed x

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Made in Africa

 

I love opening magazines and looking online for styles that l can send to my seamstress in Ghana to make into Ntoma (Twi word for African printed cloth) or Kente dresses, skirts and trousers etc.

My Seamstress made a simple Ntoma skirt with a peplum like end inspired by the Balmain Skirts in its Spring Summer 2014 collection. I paired it with a red lace top.

Made in Africa 1

African prints has indeed inspired Western Fashion and the fashion industry. It can be said it became ‘mainstream’ between 2009 and 2010. It is not uncommon to find African like prints in the high street as well on the catwalk. Fashion Brands like Matthew Williamson, Etro, Roberto Cavalli, Givenchy (and many more) have all had ‘exotic’ collections pop up now again. Celebrities like Solange Knowles, Michelle Obama, Gwen Stefani and Rihanna have embraced Ankara prints and styles. Seeing the influence that African fashion has had on the fashion industry as a whole and the strong desire for it (which has increased over the years), it is safe to say Ankara, Ntoma and Kente is here to stay.

African designers like Christie Brown, Duro Olowu, Lisa Folawiyo (Jewel by Lisa), Ituen Basi, Deola Sagoe transformed what was considered a local trend into a global trend, where everyone wants a bit of African prints. These designers reinvented traditional Ankara and Ntoma styles, for the modern woman and man. 

Franca Sozzani (Editor-in-Chief of Vogue Italia) believes that the Africa has the potential to develop into something like the brand and stamp, Made in Italy (See blog post Place to Visit- Victoria & Albert Museum’s ‘Glamour of Italian Fashion 1945-2014’). I agree! I truly believe that ‘Made in Africa’ has great craftsmanship and can be seen as a sign of style across the world.

I think I’ll write a detailed blog post on the development of Made in Africa and the Rise of African Fashion soon.

In the meantime, here are some more pictures of my outfit

Made in Africa 2

Made in Africa 3

Made in Africa 4

What was I wearing?

Red Lace Top- Marks & Spencer

Ntoma Skirt-Made by my seamstress in Ghana

Black bag- Marks & Spencer

Shoes- Zara

Stay Blessed

x

Kaba Girl

Kaba Girl 7

If you are a Ghanaian, you will know all about the ‘Kaba and Slit’. The Kaba and Slit is a top and skirt. The skirt is usually long and there is a matching top. The Kaba and Slit is Ghanaian traditional wear worn by women. You will find women wearing it at funerals to traditional marriages etc. It is also worn by other African women. The Kaba and Slit has been modernised recently where young girls incorporate western styles. I love it when traditional meets modern.

My outfit here is a Kaba and a skirt. I do have the matching slit which I wore for another occasion. However I wore the Kaba with a black skirt to keep it nice and sweet.

Kaba Girl 1

Kaba Girl 9

Outfit details:

Kaba- made by my seamstress, designer-Nena Boateng

Black Skirt- M & S

Glass Sandals- M & S

Clutch- shop from Paris

Bangle- M & S

Stay Blessed

x